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Fish Teeth

A carp’s jaw showing the position of the pharyngeal teeth (in red) at the back of the mouth A carp’s jaw showing the position of the pharyngeal teeth (in red) at the back of the mouth

The pharyngeal teeth of various types of fish have been used by many communities for decorating clothing. These teeth are located at the back of the fish’s mouth. Often the teeth were removed from the jaw during the process of cleaning and cooking of the fish. The teeth were then perforated, so they could be used as jewellery or as decoration on garments.

The pharyngeal teeth of the carp (Cyprinidae sp), for example, were used by various prehistoric Eastern European communities for decorating clothing. A Mesolithic example of carp teeth being used in this manner comes from the site of Vlasac (Serbia) and dates to about 6500 BC.

Digital source of illustration (retrieved 9th July 2016).

GVE

Last modified on Wednesday, 31 May 2017 18:15