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Haslemere Peasant Industries

Embroidered hanging produced by the Haslemere Peasant Industries, late 19th century, England. Embroidered hanging produced by the Haslemere Peasant Industries, late 19th century, England. Copyright Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK, acc. no. T.173-1978.

The Haslemere Peasant Industries is the general name given to a group of industries, workshops and societies that were set up in the late nineteenth century in Haslemere, Surrey, England. By that time, this place had become an attractive residence for various artistic people, moving from London, enjoying the country life. Among them was the poet laureate, Alfred Lord Tennyson.

The Haslemere Peasant Industries combined a group of artists and craftsmen who, as it was put, enjoyed "the double pleasure of lovely surroundings and happy work." The group produced ironwork, pottery, woodwork, fresco painting, hand-press printing, bookbinding, plasterwork and carving, but textiles were the most important craft.

The Haslemere Peasant Industries included the Haslemere Weaving Society, set up by Joseph and Maude King, where girls produced linen, cotton and silk cloth. There was also the Wheel and Spindle Club, where students were taught to produce rugs and other items. In 1896, Godfrey Blount and his wife, Ethel Hine, set up Tapestry House. This group specialised in embroidered appliqués. The Arts and Crafts movement played a major role in the simple designs of the appliqués. The decorated hangings of Tapestry House were made of linen on linen with linear embroidery, also in linen.

Most of the workshops and societies came to an end during and after the First World War.

Digital source (retrieved 11 September 2016).

V&A online catalogue (retrieved 11 September 2016).

WV

 

Last modified on Monday, 03 October 2016 18:34