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Kenmare Lace

Modern example of Kenmare needlepoint lace, worked by Sinead Hennessy, 2010, from a design drafted by the Poor Clares in c. 1880. Modern example of Kenmare needlepoint lace, worked by Sinead Hennessy, 2010, from a design drafted by the Poor Clares in c. 1880.

Kenmare lace is a needlepoint lace, which was developed after the Poor Clare Nuns had founded a convent in Kenmare, Ireland, in 1861. They also established a school to train the local women to learn a craft to make a bit of extra money. They were taught embroidery, woodcarving and leatherwork. They also developed and made lace, which they sold to wealthy tourists.

The manufacture of Kenmare lace benefited from the local establishment of a design school, with the assistance of the Kensington School of Design in London and the Crawford School of Art in Cork. Over the years however, vaious factors led to the virtual demise of this local craft. However, efforts have been made to revive the manufacture of Kenmare lace, especially after 1989, and regular festivals are being organised to promote the local craft. The 

See also Youghal lace.

Digital source of illustration (retrieved 15 October 2016).

WV

Last modified on Thursday, 27 April 2017 17:00