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Stoke Edith

Embroidered wall hanging showing the gardens of Stoke Edith House, early 18th century. The house burnt down in 1927. Embroidered wall hanging showing the gardens of Stoke Edith House, early 18th century. The house burnt down in 1927. Copyright Victoria and Albert Museum, London, acc. no. T.568-1996.

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London houses a large hanging with a representation of the gardens of Stoke Edith, Herefordshire, England. The hanging was made in England between c. 1710 and 1720. The embroidered picture was worked on linen with silk and wool thread (mainly tent stitch), and applique (the Chinese porcelain pots with fruit trees, worked with chain stitch).

The hanging measures 316/318 cm in height, and 647/667 cm width. The house and gardens of Stoke Edith were built after 1697 by Paul Foley, Speaker of the House of Commons. The constructions were completed by his son, Thomas. Whether the embroidery reflects the actual condition of the gardens remains a moot point. The embroidery shows the orangerie and the garden, containing various types of trees and plants, and also various animals. In the top left there are a man and woman, perhaps representing the owners of the house. To the left in the middle are two gentlemen with a black servant.

The house went up in flames in 1927.

Another wall hanging with a comparable design, also representing the estate of Stoke Edith, is also housed in the V&A, acc. no. T.569-1996.

V&A online catalogue (retrieved 19th December 2016).

WV

Last modified on Wednesday, 24 May 2017 11:16