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Embroidered Net Lace

Machine embroidered net lace, Germany/Switzerland, late 19th century Machine embroidered net lace, Germany/Switzerland, late 19th century Copyright Victoria and Albert Museum, London, acc. no. T.157-1964.

Embroidered net lace is a needle lace form, which developed in Europe from about the fourteenth century onwards. There are two main forms of embroidered net lace, depending on the type of net being used, namely a hand knotted net ground (filet), or a machine made net ground (tulle or bobbinet), both with a stitched design.

The filet forms may be further distinguished by the type of stitch being used, either a running stitch (the so-called needlerun laces), or filling stitches. Embroidered net lace with machine made net can likewise be distinguished on the basis of the stitches being used. When using a running stitch, the result may also be called needlerun lace.

Embroidered net laces with a hand knotted net (filet) and a running stitch decoration (the needlerun laces) include filet brodé, filet guipure, guipure d'art, Modano, Sicilian filet.

Embroidered net laces with a machine made net and chain stitch (with a needle) decoration include Kells lace.

Embroidered net laces with a machine made net and chain stitch (worked with a tambour hook) decoration include Ayrshire whiteworkCoggeshall lace, Ghent lace, Isle of Wight lace, Kells laceLier lace, Limerick tambour lace, and Luneville embroidery.

Embroidered net laces with a machine net and a running stitch decoration: Limerick run lace.

Embroidered net laces with a machine net and a combination of stitches: Breton work, Limerick lace.

See especially a schematic survey of lace types. See also the embroidered net lace sampler and the crown section of a lace cap.

Source: EARNSHAW, Pat (1988). A Dictionary of Lace, Aylesbury: Shire Publications Ltd., pp. 96-97 (lacis), 114-116 (net), 174-175 (tulle).

V&A online catalogue (retrieved 6 July 2016).

GVE

Last modified on Monday, 01 January 2018 14:23