Embroidery stitches

Embroidery stitches

The triple chain stitch is a variation on a detached chain stitch, in which the centrally placed chain stitch is held in place by two smaller chain stitches worked on either side of the apex of the main stitch. This type of stitch is associated with free-style embroidery, especially from the Arabian Peninsula.

Tsugihari-nui is the Japanese term for the double running, or Holbein stitch. WV

The twisted chain stitch is a variation on the chain stitch. The needle emerges at A. The working thread is then held down with the left thumb and the needle is inserted just above it at B, in a slanting direction. The needle is then pulled through the loop that has just been made (C). The second stitch can now be started.

The twisted fly stitch is a variation on the fly stitch, in which a loop is created by crossing over the two arms of the stitch. The loop is fastened down with a small stitch at the apex of the curve. This form can be found with the stitches close together or detached. This stitch type is used for free-style embroidery and is associated with Saudi Arabian and Yemeni embroidery.

The velvet stitch creates a pile effect on the surface of the fabric. Loops are made along horizontal lines, working from left to right, and from the bottom upwards. When completed the loops are cut and trimmed.

Wari-nui is the Japanese term for an embroidery technique used to make bird's feathers, leaves or petals. The technique is generally known as the split stitch.

The wari-tsuke-mon'yo-nui ('allocated pattern stitch') is the Japanese term for an embroidery technique that gives an overall design more complexity.

The wave stitch is a composite stitch that is made along two horizontal (guide) lines. First a series of short vertical stitches is made along the top line. Then a thread is woven through these stitches and stitched into the ground material, along the bottom line and in the middle between two of these stitches.

The weaving stitch is also known as the Queen Anne stitch or the woven filling stitch, and is a form of darning stitch, which can be used instead of a satin stitch. Stitches are made in horizontal or vertical, parallel lines. Then other stitches are made vertically or horizontally, weaving through the horizontal/vertical stitches at a straight angle.

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