Japan

Japan

Kiri-osae-nui (lit. cut-and-anchor stitch') is a laid work technique, in which a larger thread is fixed to the ground material by a series of small diagonal stitches.

Kogin zashi is a form of darned embroidery from Japan. Kogin literally means ‘small cloth’ and zashi means ‘stitches.’ Kogin zashi, or more generally and simply called kogin, is often classed as one of the sashiko forms, and was developed by the farmers of the Tsugaru district in the northern part of the Honshu Island, Japan.

Kogin zashi (or simply kogin) clothing from Japan is a regional style characterised by its decoration with a form of pattern darning. It is regarded as a form of sashiko. It derives from the Aomori Prefecture, in the northern part of Honshu Island, Japan.

The kogin zashi technique is a form of darned embroidery from Japan. Kogin literally means ‘small cloth’ and zashi means ‘stitches.’ Kogin zashi is often classed as one of the sashiko forms, which was developed by the farmers of the Tsugaru district in the northern part of the Honshu Island, Japan. The patterns used for kogin zashi are stitched only on the upper area of kogin zashi clothes, using small, horizontal running stitches.

Koma-nui is the Japanese term for a form of couching, whereby the couching metal (gold or sliver) thread is fixed to the ground material with thin silk thread.

Komezashi is the Japanese term for the rice stitch, used among others for Shonai sashiko. WV

Shizuka Kusano is one of the most admired textile artists in Japan. She works particularly on the decoration of kimono, obi (sashes) and tapestries. She has been teaching at various institutes, and partook in more than thirty exhibitions. One of her most important books is The Fine Art of Kimono Embroidery (New York: Kodansha America, 2006, reprint 2012).

Kusari-nui is the Japanese term for the chain stitch. WV

Kyo-nui is the general Japanese term for the embroidery traditions in Kyoto. WV

Matsuri-nui is the Japanese term for a common embroidery technique to express lines.

The Japanese term mingei literally means 'ordinary people’s craft'. It is used for the Mingei movement, the Japanese version of the Arts and Crafts movement. The Mingei movement started in the 1920's and was led by the Japanese philosopher, Soetsu Yanagi (1889-1961). 

Mishima kogin in Japan is a form of kogin zashi and is characterised by pattern darning. Kogin literally means 'small cloth' and zashi means 'stitches'. Kogin is one of the sashiko forms, which were developed by the farmers of the Tsugaru region in the northern part of Honshu Island, Japan, and particular from the delta of the Iwaki river.

Moyouzashi sashiko is a very simple form of sashiko, whereby use is made of straight or curved lines of running stitches and the stitches never cross each other. Garments are made by sewing together smaller pieces of cloth, using small running stitches. The stitches form straight or curved lines.

The term nambu hishi zashi refers to a stitched lozenge pattern that is characteristic for the embroidery from the Nambu district, Japan.

Niku-ire-nui is a Japanese embroidery technique that creates a raised look by the use of a cotton padding. Generally called the padded satin stitch.

Nishi kogin is a form of kogin zashi (a type of pattern darning) from Japan. Kogin literally means 'small cloth' and zashi means 'stitches'. It is one of the sashiko forms, and was developed by the farmers of the Tsugaru region in the northern part of Honshu Island, Japan, and in particular from west of the Iwaki River.

Nui-kiri is the Japanese term for a free-style embroidery technique that is being used for smaller designs, such as petals or leaves.

Nuihaku is a Japanese embroidery technique that involves embroidery and the use of metal leaf. It is still being used for Noh garments.

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