Wodehouse Jacket

The Wodehouse jacket, English, early 17th century. The Wodehouse jacket, English, early 17th century. Copyright Boston Museum of Fine Arts, USA, acc. no. 43.243. The Elizabeth Day McCormick Collection

The Wodehouse jacket is an early seventeenth century woman’s garment housed in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, USA. The jacket dates to 1610-1615 and appears to have been altered at a later period. It is made from an undyed linen (tabby weave), and decorated with silk and metallic threads, as well as spangles and bobbin lace made with a metallic thread. The design on the jacket consists of a daffodil scroll pattern.

The jacket is said to have been made for and worn by a member of the Wodehouse family, from Kimberley (Norfolk, England), possibly Grizell Wodehouse (d. 1635), the wife of Sir Philip Wodehouse (d. 1623; the first baronet of Wilberhall). According to family legend, the jacket was given to the family by Queen Elizabeth I (r: 1558-1603). However, the cut of the garment and the style of embroidery date to after the Queen’s death.

The jacket was acquired by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts in 1942, along with two other items that are associated with the family, namely a contemporary woman’s coif and forehead piece (acc. no. 43.244a-b) and a much later, falcon’s hood (38.1300).

Boston Museum of Fine Arts online catalogue (retrieved 26th March 2017).

GVE

Last modified on Sunday, 21 May 2017 07:56